the burqa ban – a victory or a defeat?

The Netherlands has banned the wearing of the burqa in some public spaces and many on the right are applauding this as a great victory. But is it really?

Think about it. Is it really a terrific idea to give the government the power to arrest people for expressing their religious faith publicly? Do we really believe that such a power will never be turned against other religions? Such as, for example, Christianity. Because let’s be quite clear – if it’s OK for the government to arrest a woman for wearing a burqa then it must also be OK for the government to arrest someone for wearing a crucifix. And if you don’t think this power will ever be used against Christians then you must have been asleep for the last fifty years.

The burqa ban is in fact a great victory for the forces of secularism. The aim of the secularists has been to marginalise religion, to make religion something that can only be practised furtively and in private. They have been waging war on religion and the burqa ban is a significant win for them. They have established that nobody has the right to profess their religious faith in public. They have established that religion is something that should be subject to government control and regulation.

My feeling is that many on the right are so blinded by their hatred of Islam that they are not seeing the real picture. Religion is under attack by the forces of secular liberalism. All religions are under attack. This is a war to the death. The secular liberals intend to create a world in which religion will be banned.

The Dutch Interior Minister Kajsa Ollongren claims that the ban does not violate fundamental rights, because it will enable Muslim women “to have access to a wider social life” because if they do not cover the face “they will have more possibilities for contact, communication and opportunities to enter the job market.”

This is quite sinister if you think about it. In fact it’s extremely sinister. What she’s saying in effect is that Muslim women should not be allowed to live their lives according to their religion. Instead they are to be pushed into adopting secular western lifestyles. Because naturally the government has the right to tell people how to live their lives, even to the extent of telling us that religion will no longer be a permitted part of our lives. Some of these Muslim women are evidently putting their families first instead of concentrating on their careers. But don’t worry, the government will not allow that to continue.

This has nothing whatsoever to do with immigration. You can be vehemently and passionately anti-immigration (as I am) and still think that the burqa ban is a very very bad idea. It’s another step on the road to feminist totalitarianism.

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9 comments on “the burqa ban – a victory or a defeat?

  1. I highly doubt there's any need in banning crucifix in a country that tends to use its cathedrals as skate parks.

  2. dfordoom says:

    I highly doubt there's any need in banning crucifix in a country that tends to use its cathedrals as skate parks.

    True enough. The West is already very much post-Christian. But that's not enough for those who hate Christianity – they will not be satisfied until Christianity is entirely extirpated beyond any hope of revival. That's the key – as long as they think there's still a one in a thousand chance of a Christian revival they will continue their attacks.

    And they would be overjoyed by the opportunity this kind of legislation offers to humiliate and harass the few remaining Christians.

    This kind of thing, the so-called burqa ban, is another step towards compulsory secularism.

  3. By the way, have you thought about the fact that China today has 100 million people who visit Catholic churches and megachurches regularly? It might be more than the whole of Europe has nowadays, especially if you consider true believers, not “recreational” Catholics.

  4. dfordoom says:

    By the way, have you thought about the fact that China today has 100 million people who visit Catholic churches and megachurches regularly?

    Yes, and it's something I have very mixed feelings about. I think it's probably going to be a disaster for China.

    I have mixed feelings about Christianity in general. Christianity's universalism and its surrender to feminism have been catastrophic for European civilisation.

  5. Why should it be a disaster for China? Those Catholics are indeed patriotic, there's nothing wrong with them.

    Well, I thought Protestantism surrendered to feminism, not Catholic and most certainly not Orthodox confessions. What exactly do you mean?

  6. dfordoom says:

    Why should it be a disaster for China? Those Catholics are indeed patriotic, there's nothing wrong with them.

    Maybe. The universalism of Christianity tends to make Christians an anti-nationalist force. I suspect they'll prove to be a very major problem for China in the long term. China is likely to face major efforts at destabilisation from the U.S. and Christians could serve as a Fifth Column.

    Those Christians are also likely to get involved in agitating for democracy and the one thing that is certain to destroy China is democracy.

  7. Interesting. I actually tend to think that these 100 million of Catholics in China is a 100% good thing, because it makes them all immune to the regressive leftist ideas of degeneracy.

  8. dfordoom says:

    I actually tend to think that these 100 million of Catholics in China is a 100% good thing, because it makes them all immune to the regressive leftist ideas of degeneracy.

    You might be right. I hope you are. I don't really know enough about Catholicism in China, whether they tend to be hardcore traditionalist Catholics or modernisers.

  9. They're about as far from contemporary European Catholics as one can get.

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