sleeping her way to the top

The recent scandals in Hollywood have highlighted something that everyone used to know but these days no-one is supposed to talk about – women sleeping their way to the top.

This has been going on from the first moment that women started entering the workforce, or more particularly since women started working in areas that were previously male-only. It is of course absolutely inevitable. If you have a mixed-sex workplace then women will figure out that they can trade sex for career advancement.  Not all women will do so, but a lot of women will.

In Hollywood it arguably doesn’t really matter. If an actress is willing to follow the time-honoured practices of Hollywood, in other words if she’s willing to have sex with producers in return for getting a shot at good rôles in good movies, then she may get plum rôles that really should have gone to other, more talented, actresses.  But Hollywood only makes movies so it’s not a serious problem for society as a whole.

On the other hand when women start doing the same thing in business, politics, the military, the police force, etc (which they do) it can have very serious consequences. In these fields it really does matter that the top jobs go to people with genuine ability, rather than just a willingness to spread their sexual favours around. It does matter if women who use sex to further their careers take jobs away from better qualified men or women.

When you look at women who do reach the top you can’t help wondering how many have in fact slept their way to the top. It’s extraordinary how many of these women seem quite unable to cope with the demands of the top jobs once they get them.

It’s absurdly unrealistic to think that there’s any way you can stop this from happening. Mixed-sex workplaces simply do not work, and never will. It’s not just the problem of unscrupulous women doing so consciously. There’s also the uncomfortable fact of female hypergamy. Women are attracted to powerful high-status men. A woman is going to want to sleep with her boss even if she doesn’t intend to use this circumstance to further her career. She’ll want to sleep with him simply because he has status and power. And it’s not terribly realistic to believe that he won’t then do things to help her career along.

It’s not just women sleeping their way to the top. There’s also the related issue of women marrying their way to the top. There have for example been plenty of instances of women basing careers on particularly favourable marriages. There is the case of a certain woman who almost succeeded in getting to the very top of the political tree in the United States, merely by virtue of being married to a man who had occupied that very job.

There are many reasons why women should not be in the workplace. The “sleeping her way to the top” phenomenon is just one of them.

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the Hollywood sex scandals

I’ve avoided the subject of the recent sex scandals in Hollywood involving Harvey Weinstein and others but since I have a particular interest in the nexus between popular culture and politics I probably do need to address this issue. It’s actually a rather complicated issue which sheds some fascinating light on the sorry state of our culture in general.

The first point to be made is that it’s absurd for anyone to pretend to be surprised by any of this. This is how Hollywood has always worked. If you want a part in a movie you have to be nice to powerful people like producers and everyone in Hollywood has always known exactly what that means. Any aspiring actress (or actor) who arrives in Tinsel Town hoping to be a star knows what he or she will have to do to achieve that aim. If the price is unacceptable then the smart move is to forget being a star and keep away from Hollywood. In the unlikely event that you are really are naïve enough to be unaware of this reality then within about ten minutes of getting off the bus you’re going to figure it out. If you don’t like the idea, get back on that bus.

As 1940s Hollywood star Hedy Lamarr put it, “The ladder of success in Hollywood is usually a press agent, actor, director, producer, leading man; and you are a star if you sleep with each of them in that order. Crude, but true.”

Obviously it’s a different situation with child actors, and one of the reasons the allegations of homosexual predation in Hollywood are more disturbing is that they do involve children. In these cases it’s a matter of parental responsibility. If you want your kid to be a star then unless you’re prepared to watch him like a hawk it’s almost certain he’ll attract the attention of these predators. Of course these days parental responsibility is pretty much an unknown concept.

I’m certainly not trying to get sleazy Hollywood producers off the hook. There’s no doubt that Hollywood is, and always has been, full of sleazebags who use their power to have sex with pretty starlets. It’s totally reprehensible and obviously morally wrong. It is however worth bearing in mind that where such incidents involve actresses who are legally adults then there is highly likely to be fault on both sides. Hollywood attracts sleazy men but it also attracts women who are willing, sometimes even eager, to trade their sexual favours for career advancement. We need to be wary of falling for the feminist line that women have no agency. If an actress is of legal age and she’s willing to have sex with a producer to get a film role then she must accept her fair share of the responsibility. The trouble with Hollywood is that it’s corrupt all the way through and it corrupts everybody, literally everybody, that it touches.

It’s noticeable that actresses who make accusations of sexual harassment usually seem to do so only years later when it’s becoming obvious that their careers are fading. As long as they think there’s still a chance to hang on to their dreams of stardom they tend to keep their mouths shut. One can’t help suspecting that at the time of the alleged events they were in fact perfectly willing to trade sex for stardom. We need to keep in mind that in spite of the lies of feminists it is extremely common for women to sleep their way to the top (and not just in Hollywood).

The other important point to remember is that at this stage what we have are a great many allegations of the he said/she said variety. Such allegations are by their very nature unprovable. Unfortunately in most cases in which allegations are made against public figures they are of this type. Even more unfortunately it is by no means unknown for people to be convicted of an offence even when it is a matter of one person’s word against another’s. There have been cases in which convictions have been obtained on the basis of very questionable evidence.

It is particularly dangerous to accept accusations in situations where no charges have even been laid. It’s sad that many on the Right have been so excited by the prospect of watching the suffering of Hollywood liberals that they have lost sight of the importance of the presumption of innocence. Even Hollywood scum are entitled to the presumption of innocence.  It’s quite possible that most of the accusations are actually true, but it’s equally possible that many are quite untrue. We live in a society that offers generous rewards to anyone making accusations of sexual misconduct against public figures. It is all part of the corruption of our society.

Obviously anything that makes Hollywood look bad is to be welcomed but we must be aware that this situation is going to be spun in a way that supports the narrative. In this case it’s going to be spun to support a particularly vicious part of the feminist narrative, that women need never take responsibility and that everything is always the fault of those evil patriarchal white heterosexual males.

watching movies and TV after taking the red pill

One of the problems with becoming “red-pilled” is that a lot of simple pleasures become less simple. Steve Sailer always talks about noticing things, and once you start noticing things you can’t stop.
Popular culture becomes a real problem. Even the popular culture of the past can be perplexing. I love old movies but these days I can’t help noticing just how much propaganda Hollywood has always included in its movies. Back in the 30s and 40s and 50s the propaganda had to be subtle, they couldn’t risk showing their hand too obviously, but the messages are there and they’re insistent.
There is for example a subtle anti-marriage bias. The message is always that love is what matters, not commitment or responsibility. And it’s always pretty obvious that in this context love means pure sexual lust and/or abandonment to emotional excess. OK so we’d all like our marriages to include amazing heights of sexual passion and non-stop emotional bliss but we realise that in the real world it doesn’t always work that way. On the other hand commitment and responsibility can make for a relationship that is a lot more fulfilling in the long term. In a cautious low-key way the Hollywood movies of that era keep on undermining the commitment and responsibility bits. They couldn’t dare to attack marriage directly but there is quite a bit of undermining going on.
There’s an astonishing amount of anti-Christian propaganda, done very skillfully and very subtly indeed. Devout Christians are usually portrayed as being slightly ridiculous, or excessively moralistic, or (especially) hypocritical. Actually conforming to the teachings of Christianity is made to seem out-of-date and eccentric. For the most part the heroes we are encouraged to identify with are solidly secular.

Hollywood has always been basically hostile to western society and to Christian values although they used to be better at hiding the fact.
I’m also very fond of old TV shows, from the 50s up to the 70s. And again there’s a great deal of mostly low-key propaganda. If you watch British television from that era you’ll be hard pressed to find a single example of a sympathetic portrayal of a practising Christian. The message, never stated directly but always there, is that normal people are secular in outlook. Christians are odd.
The propaganda in American television in the 60s was often remarkably up-front. Anyone who’s ever watched Rod Serling’s classic The Twilight Zone will have noticed that they’re being subjected to an endless barrage of liberal propaganda. Serling used television as a soapbox, and he used it relentlessly. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenbery was another liberal who saw television as a means of pushing his agenda, although he was rarely as crude about it as Serling.
And of course there are the action heroines, the feminine and often petite ladies who can easily beat up bad guys twice their size. Feminist silliness has been preached tirelessly by television for sixty years now.
These are examples of message television that are fairly obvious but the same messages, in more muted firms, are present in countless series.
This doesn’t mean that it’s impossible to enjoy movies and television of the past. It is impossible to enjoy the movies and TV of today so the old stuff is really the only option. It can be enjoyed but you’ll still find yourself doing a lot of noticing. I blog about both old movies (at Classic Movie Ramblings) and old TV series (at Cult TV Lounge) and I try to concentrate on the positives and in those blogs I also try to avoid getting overtly political, although I do throw in some very low-key political observations. It’s quite an interesting challenge, trying not to frighten off readers who aren’t red-pilled.

Big Business and the myth of the bottom line

One of the most important recent news items, the full significance of which is likely to be missed by most people, concerns Starbucks’ support for homosexual marriage. The key ingredient of this story is the statement by Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz that, “it is not an economic decision to me.” Schultz doesn’t care if the decision COSTS Starbucks money.
There is one core belief that has historically united both the Left and the Right and that is the belief that Big Business cares about nothing but the bottom line. To the Old Left it was the proof that capitalism is wicked and evil. To neocons on the other hand that is the great virtue of capitalism – it’s what makes capitalism so efficient. To most conservatives it’s just an unquestioned assumption.
The problem is that it simply isn’t true, and never was. The bottom line is certainly a considerable motivation but there are other motivations as well. Most notably, power and fear. Money is attractive but once you’ve made your first billion money ceases to be a motivation in and of itself. Money becomes a means of gaining power. You don’t want to increase your fortune from one billion to ten billion because you want the money – you want the money because it will buy power. You are quite happy to sacrifice a few billion to increase your power and influence.
If you doubt this just take a look at Hollywood. Does anyone believe that movies like Selma get made because they will be guaranteed money-spinners? Hardly. In fact Hollywood has always been motivated as much by the desire for the approval of the elites as by profit. In the 40s the studios churned out “prestige pictures” which made little money (or even lost money). They did so as a way of gaining respectability. Hollywood today is obsessed by political correctness. The movie-makers believe in such nonsense. The studio chiefs do not. What they believe is that it’s in their interests to placate powerful lobby groups (homosexuals, greens, etc) and to curry favour with other members of the elite. The media in general is more about power than money. You don’t run a newspaper to make money. You know it will lose money. You run a newspaper to gain power.
Fear is a major factor. When corporations give millions of dollars to leftist political parties, extremist green groups or campaigns for homosexual “marriage” that does not imply that those corporations support those interests. What it does imply that is that those corporations are afraid of those groups. In many cases it’s a desperate (one might even say pathetic) attempt to ingratiate themselves with people they fear.
And then of course there are cultural marxist CEOs like Howard Schultz whose motivations are overtly  
ideological, in which cases advancing the ideology becomes much more important than making money. Even if he eventually drives the company to ruin it’s not as if he’s going to end up living on the streets. He’s made his pile. If the company goes down the toilet the employees will suffer but you can be sure that Howard Schultz won’t do any suffering.
Conservatives, and especially social conservatives and traditional conservatives, need to understand that Big Business is not their friend. Big Business is much more likely to be a bitter enemy.

1950s Hollywood anti-communist movies

I’ve been getting into 1950s anti-communist movies recently. These movies have for years been dismissed by liberal film critics as paranoia movies. In fact they depict the activities, the methods and the mindset of communists pretty accurately. And at least a couple of these movies can be regarded as pretty good examples of film noir.
I’ve reviewed two these films recently on my classic movies blog – RKO’s 1949 production The Woman on Pier 13 (originally released as I Married a Communist) and Warner Brothers’ 1950 offering I Was a Communist for the FBI. The latter was based on a true story. Both movies deal with communist infiltration of labour unions, which was in fact one of the favoured methods of the Communist Party at that time, both in the United States and in other countries.
If these movies have a fault it’s perhaps that they let the unions off the hook too easily, but Hollywood has always been a union so it was unlikely that a movie critical of the union movement was ever going to get made. In fact given the large-scale real-life communist infiltration of Hollywood and the domination of Hollywood by liberals it’s surprising that these anti-communist movies got made. The only problem with the movie industry’s response to communist infiltration, the blacklist, is that it didn’t go far enough.
Both of these movies are worth a look, both for their historical interest and as worthy examples of the film noir of the period. They’re a reminder of a time when Americans were still willing to fight back against leftist tyranny.